According to the CDC, COPD Deaths Down for Most Americans

From 2000-2014, 12% Drop in COPD deaths in the US

Background: COPD is the 3rd leading cause of death in the United States after heart disease and cancer. None of the available medical treatments for those with COPD, such as inhaled medications, have been shown to affect mortality. Report: The Center for Disease Control and Prevention, known as the CDC, reported on September 8, 2016, that between 2000 and 2014, there was a 12% overall drop in COPD deaths. Dr. Hanyu Ni, a co-author of the findings, commented that the findings were not unexpected because, “they are consistent with the declines in the prevalence of current smoking for men and women in the United States.” The results were reported in the US National Center for Health Statistics.
COPD includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema.

COPD includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema.

COPD deaths were analysed by sex and race. For women, there was little change for Caucasians, while African-Americans had a 4% increase in death rate over the 14 years. For men, Caucasians experienced a drop of 21%, and African-Americans had a decline of about 24%.
Reduced smoking may explain the overall decline in COPD deaths.

Man and woman smoking a igarettte

Dr. Ni commented that the analysis did not explore the reasons for the trends. However, he stated that the figures weren’t unexpected noting that the declines in COPD deaths are consistent with fewer women and men currently smoking in the U.S.
David Mannino, M.D., Professor and Chair of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health at the University of Kentucky.

David Mannino, M.D., Professor and Chair of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health at the University of Kentucky.

Dr. David Mannino suggested that additional factors unrelated to smoking might affect COPD deaths. He proposed that poverty and/or lack of access to health care “may explain some the racial differences.”

Donald A. Mahler, M.D. is Emeritus Professor of Medicine at Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth in Hanover, New Hampshire. He works as a pulmonary physician at Valley Regional Hospital in Claremont, NH, where he is Director of Respiratory Services.