Can Depression Affect my Breathing and COPD?

Depression Occurs in 25% of those with COPD

Dear Dr. Mahler: I wanted to know your thoughts on whether depression can affect my breathing. I am 57 years old and have had COPD for about 3 years. I seem to be tired all of the time and get short of breath with little activity. I was treated for depression when I was in my 20s, but have been fine until about 3 months ago. I work as a teacher’s aide in a grade school in my town, and am now off for the summer. I quit smoking soon after I was told that I had COPD. I have an appointment with a nurse practioner in a few weeks. What do you think? Karen from Tupper Lake, NY  Dear Karen: I encourage you to discuss your concerns with your health care provider. Being tired and feeling short of breath may be due to various causes including a low red blood cell level (anemia), low thyroid function (hypothyroidism), another medical problem, and a psychological condition. I suspect that the nurse practioner will order tests to check for these possibilities.
Man with depression

Man with depression

Depression is considered a mood disorder caused by changes in chemicals within the brain. According to the World Health Organization, it is estimated that 21% of women and 12% of men in the U.S will experience an episode of depression at some point in their lifetime. Recent reports from the United Kingdom and from the U.S. found that about one in four (25%) of those diagnosed with COPD suffer from depression over a three year period. The risk of an episode of depression is related more to how may episodes you have had in the past rather than life stresses. Your previous treatment in your 20s simply means an increase in risk for another episode. That is why is important that your health care provider do a complete evaluation of all possible causes of your symptoms.
Effects of depression

Effects of depression

This condition can affect your thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and overall physical health. Typical feelings are sadness, hopelessness, guilt, moodiness, and loss of interest in friends and family. You may find that it is hard to concentrate or make decisions. It is common to withdraw from others, use drugs or alcohol to “numb yourself” in order to temporarily feel better, and miss work or other commitments. Other symptoms are lack of energy and changes in appetite resulting in weight gain or weight loss. Depression is usually diagnosed by excluding other medical conditions and by your answers to a questionnaire. Once again, tell you health care provider how you are feeling and that you were treated for depression in the past. Best wishes, Donald A. Mahler, M.D.  

Donald A. Mahler, M.D. is Emeritus Professor of Medicine at Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth in Hanover, New Hampshire. He works as a pulmonary physician at Valley Regional Hospital in Claremont, NH, where he is Director of Respiratory Services.