Sitting Time and Obesity in Men Living in the United States

More Sitting Time for Men – More Likely to Be Obese

Background: The Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported in November 2016 that over one-third (35%) of adults in the United States are obese. Obesity is typically defined by Body Mass Index (abbreviated BMI). BMI is calculated by weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters. You can ask your health care provider to calculate your BMI at your next appointment. A value between 25 and 30 means someone is overweight. A BMI value of 30 or higher indicates obesity. Study: Dr. Carolyn Barlow and colleagues at the Cooper Institute in Dallas, Texas,  reported the results of a study which analyzed sitting time and body weight.  The study was published in December 29, 2016, issue of the journal Prevention of Chronic Diseases.  doi: 10.5888/pcd13.160263. Results: Estimates of sitting time, measures of obesity, blood lipids, blood glucose, blood pressure, and exercise testing were collected in 4,486 men and 1,845 women. Nearly one-half of the men reported sitting three-fourths of the day, while only 13% of women said the same. Men who sat almost all of the time were more likely to be obese as measured by waist size (circumference) or body fat compared with men who sat almost none of the time. Sitting time was NOT associated with other cardiac risk factors. For women, there was no significant association between sitting time and cardiac risk factors. Conclusions: The researchers could not pinpoint a cause for the higher rates of obesity in sedentary men. Dr. Barlow said that one limitation of the study was that subjects were mainly white, generally healthy, and well educated. The authors suggested that reducing sitting time can be a first step in a plan for men to be more active.
Woman working at desk reduces sitting time

Woman working at stand up desk

My Comments:  In a previous study from the Cooper Institute (Mayo Clinic Proceeding, September 29, 2015), researchers showed that standing for at least one-quarter of the day was linked to a lower risk of obesity. For example, standing a quarter of the time was linked to a reduced chance of obesity (by 32% in men and by 35% in women) . If you sit at desk for work or for using a computer, consider getting a stand up desk with adjustable height that allows you to stand.

Donald A. Mahler, M.D. is Emeritus Professor of Medicine at Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth in Hanover, New Hampshire. He works as a pulmonary physician at Valley Regional Hospital in Claremont, NH, where he is Director of Respiratory Services.