Reduced Exacerbations with Two Bronchodilators

11% Reduced Exacerbations with Dual Bronchodilators

Dear Dr. Mahler:

I recently read about the results of the FLAME study on a COPD website.  As I understand the post, two different bronchodilators were better for reducing flare-ups of COPD than Advair.  I am 59 years old and have had COPD for four years. My doctor started me on Advair Diskus when I was diagnosed along with ProAir as needed. I have been doing pretty good, but had pneumonia this past winter. Should I ask my doctor about the two bronchodilator combination instead of taking Advair? Thanks for your advice.

Sam from Boulder, CO

Dear Sam:

The results of the FLAME study were presented at the International Conference of the American Thoracic Society in San Francisco in May 2016 and published in the New England Journal of Medicine on May 15, 2016 (doi:10:1056/NEJMoa1516385). Dr. Jadwiga Wedzicha is the first author of the study.

The FLAME study was a head-to-head comparison of: ♦ two different types of bronchodilators [indacaterol – a long-acting beta-agonist and glycopyrronium – a long-acting muscarinic antagonist] – brand name is Ultibro AND ♦ a bronchodilator [salmeterol] and an inhaled corticosteroid [fluticasone] – brand name is Advair.

3,300 patients from 43 countries participated in the study. After one year, the rate of COPD exacerbations (“flare-ups”) was 11% lower with indacaterol-glycopyrronium compared with salmeterol-fluticasone. Patients who received the two bronchodilators also had better quality of life and used albuterol as rescue medication less frequently.

Dr. Wedzicha commented that, “I think we can say that . . . a dual bronchodilator is the first choice combination that can be used in patients with COPD.”

Sam – I suggest that you discuss these findings with your doctor. You should be aware that an inhaled corticosteroid medication (such as fluticasone as found in Advair) is associated with an increased risk of pneumonia. For this reason alone, it would be reasonable to stop Advair since you had pneumonia this past winter. The reduced exacerbations (flare-ups) with indacaterol/glycopyrronium (Ultibro) is another reason to consider a dual bronchodilator inhaler. At the present, Ultibro is not available in the US.

Anoro Ellipta dry powder inhaler

Anoro Ellipta dry powder inhaler

Stiolto Respimat delivers a fine mist.

Stiolto Respimat delivers a fine mist.

However, Anoro Ellipta and Stiolto Respimat are dual bronchodilators available in the US and are similar to Ultibro used in the study. Neither of these medications contain a inhaled corticosteroid.

 

Once again, I encourage you to talk to your doctor about the results of the FLAME study and ask her/him about replacing Advair with one of the two combination bronchodilators.

Best wishes,

Donald A. Mahler, M.D.

New Inhaler – Bevespi – Approved for COPD

FDA approves new Dual Bronchodilator – Bevespi

On April 25, 2016, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved a new inhaler called Bevespi Aerosphere™ for long-term maintenance treatment for those with COPD.

Bevespi is a pressurized metered-dose inhaler

Bevespi is a pressurized metered-dose inhaler

 

What is Bevespi?  It contains two different bronchodilators that act to relax muscles that wraps around breathing tubes. One medication is called glycopyrrolate – a muscarinic antagonsit – and the other medication is called formoterol – a beta agonist. The two medications are delivered using a unique co-suspension technology. It is to be used twice a day, 12 hours apart.

Other Dual Bronchodilator Products Bevespi is the fourth dual bronchodilator in a single device approved in the United States.  Others dual bronchodilators in order of approval by the FDA are: Anoro Ellipta®, Stiolto Respimat®, and Utibron NeoHaler®. Studies show that using two different bronchodilators are more effective in improving how the lungs work and making it easier to breathe than one bronchodilator.

It is likely that Bevespi Aerosphere™ will be available in pharmacies later this year.